Six Days You Shall Labor (Pilgrimage)


“Six days you shall labor and do all your work,” (Exodus 20:9; NASB).

 

In Western nations, we have developed a tradition of a five-day work week followed by two days of rest. The reason for this was originally so that Christians would have a day to prepare for the Sabbath, a day to visit the market and get all of their provisions for the week, before attending worship and resting in the Lord on the Lord’s Day. The point was that we would each have six days to labor (earn a daily wage) and complete all our work (including all necessary preparations for the Sabbath).

What has become of this Western week, though, is nothing close to what was originally intended. Westerners in general, and yes even Christians in the West, have come to observe Saturday as a sort of Sabbath to self and to family. Sunday in America for example has largely come to be observed as a day to…

  • Rush off to church in a huff…
  • Watch the clock until the pastor is done preaching or yawning through his preaching because of lack of sleep the night before…
  • Rush home to catch the kickoff or to the local restaurant to beat the other Christians before the parking lots fill up…
  • Nap for several hours…
  • And finally spend the evening getting the kids ready for the next day at school and preparing to return to work the next day.
Imagine how much more enriching our Lord’s Day would be, and how much more focused and heartfelt our worship would be, if we truly spent the other six days laboring and completing all our work. During your pilgrimage this week, consider how it is that you might work with all diligence to complete all that is needed so that you might clear your entire Lord’s Day for God and His people. How might your week—indeed how might your life—look different?